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Things You Didn’t Know About Zenande Mfenyana

Things You Didn’t Know About Zenande Mfenyana

Things You Didn’t Know About Zenande Mfenyana

All the things you should know about Zenande Mfenyana has been properly detailed for you in this very article. Zenande Mfenyana was born on the 11th of October, 1985, in Johannesburg, South Africa. She’s a South African model and actress, One notable thing to know about Zenande Mfenyana is that she came into the spotlight in August 2011 where she starred on Mfundi Vundla’s SABC 1’s soap opera Generations. After completing her matric at the Queenstown Girl’s High School, she later enrolled at the University of Pretoria and holds a BA in Drama. She has gone over the years to feature in some popular films like; Generations, Ashes of Ashes, Igazi, MTV Shuga (Down South), and The Queen. You need to read further below in order to still know about Zenande Mfenyana.

She portrayed the role of Noluntu Memela, the daughter of Mawande Memela until she was fired in August 2014 due to a strike that featured 15 of the cast members, including Connie Ferguson (Karabo Moroka), Sophie Ndaba (Queen Moroka) and Nambitha Mpumlwana (Mawande Memela). Mfenyana also starred as Reba on e.tv’s soap opera Ashes to Ashes, alongside Tina Jaxa and Menzi Ngubane. Mfenyana then played the main role of Babalwa on seasons one and two of the Ferguson Films’ Mzansi Magic’s Xhosa drama series Igazi, alongside Vatiswa NdaraJet Novuka, and the late Nomhle Nkonyeni. She equally plays the main role of Goodness Mabuza on the Ferguson Films’ Mzansi Magic series The Queen, alongside its producers Shona and Connie Ferguson. Now, we’ll be providing you details which you need to know about Zenande Mfenyana, as regards to her early life and career.

Zenande Mfenyana

All You Need to Know About Zenande Mfenyana

We’ll first of all detail you on her early life and education, then we’ll tell you more about her career.

  • Zenande Mfenyana is a South African model and actress born on the 11th of October, 1985, in Johannesburg, South Africa.
  • She moved to the Eastern Cape in Queenstown where she completed her matric at Queenstown Girls’ High School.
  • She was enrolled at the University of Pretoria and holds a BA in Drama.
  • Mfenyana came into the spotlight in August 2011 where she starred on Mfundi Vundla’s SABC 1’s soap opera Generations.
  • She portrayed the role of Noluntu Memela, the daughter of Mawande Memela until she was fired in August 2014 due to a strike that featured 15 of the cast members, including Connie Ferguson (Karabo Moroka), Sophie Ndaba (Queen Moroka) and Nambitha Mpumlwana (Mawande Memela).
  • In January 2015, Mfenyana starred as Reba on e.tv’s soap opera Ashes to Ashes, alongside Tina Jaxa and Menzi Ngubane.
  • Mfenyana then played the main role of Babalwa on seasons one and two of the Ferguson Films’ Mzansi Magic’s Xhosa drama series Igazi, alongside Vatiswa Ndara, Jet Novuka, and the late Nomhle Nkonyeni.
  • As of February 2017, she plays the main role of Goodness Mabuza on the Ferguson Films’ Mzansi Magic series The Queen, alongside its producers Shona and Connie Ferguson.
Things You Didn’t Know About Zenande Mfenyana

Controversies on Social Media

  • About 3 months ago, Zenande Mfenyana has fans pondering whether she’s pregnant or not. The tweet generated about 37781 views by Desere Davis, and her fans think that there have been some clues to make this a real possibility.
  • The Queen actress has her fans and admirers suspicious – they think she’s got a bun in the oven.
  • The actress has always kept her private life very separate from her career and there’s isn’t much that she’s willing to divulge. If she is indeed pregnant, it will be a while yet before Zenande lets anyone know it.

Bonus Tip – Level 3 Lockdown in South Africa and its Effect in Zenande Mfenyana’s Career

The Covid-19 pandemic has actually affected the world at large, South Africa inclusive. Due to this, there have been strict lockdown measures been imposed by different governments of the world. This has really affected lots of businesses, the movie industry and the music industry as well. So to say, giving the fact that Zenande Mfenyana’s career is built around the movie industry, she’s not an exception.

 So, therefore, we’ll be talking more about South Africa’s Lock-down measures (Level 3).

South Africa’s Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta) has further outlined the regulatory changes for the country’s lockdown level 3 which took effect last week (June 1st). At a media briefing on the 28th of May, 2020, Cogta minister Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma said that all of the country’s economic sectors will be opened, albeit with restrictions. She said that the essence of the strategy involved in level 3 lockdown in South Africa is based on sound scientific advice as well as international organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO). She also stated that the economic challenges been faced in the country of recent mainly contributed to the ease of the lockdown.

As part of the level 3 regulatory changes introduced by the country’s Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (Cogta), South Africans will now be allowed to purchase alcohol.

The regulations state that the sale of liquor will be permitted between Monday- and Thursday and between 09h00 – 17h00. Online sales will be subject to the same times, while no liquor may be consumed onsite.

The sale of tobacco products remains prohibited – although this issue is set to be challenged in court in the coming week.

South Africa’s Minister of Justice and Correctional Services “Ronald Lamola” says that South Africans will still have restricted exercise times under the country’s level 3 lockdown. The updated exercise times will now be between 06h00 – 18h00.

He added that South Africans will be required to wear masks at all times and may not exercise in groups. The 5km radius has seemingly been lifted.

Lamola has previously explained that the restriction on exercise and the evening curfew was introduced to help the South African Police Services (SAPS).

This combined with the return to work of more than eight million people means far more movement that the police will need to monitor.

The country has removed the country’s evening curfew (20h00 – 05h00) under the latest regulations and will allow inter-provincial travel for workers.

These workers require a permit from their place of employment to show their purpose for traveling.

Other travel changes announced by government include:

  • Publish of a new directive which extends the validity of expired licenses and registrations for 90 days from 1st June, by the Department of Transport.
  • Allowing some rail services to operate during the level 3 lockdown – including the Gautrain, as indicated by the Minister of Transport Fikile Mbalula.
  • Allowing for domestic air travel for business purposes also published by Fikile Mbalula.

South Africa’s Tourism minister Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane says her department is putting together a proposal to submit to the National Coronavirus Command Council to allow restaurants to open up more services under lockdown level 3.

In a media briefing on Saturday, she also outlined the following areas that have been opened up under Level 3:

  • Restaurants for delivery or collection of food. Restaurants with liquor licenses are allowed to sell alcohol only for takeout and delivery.
  • Professional services – e.g. tourist guides, tour operators, travel agents, tourism information officers are allowed to come back to operations.
  • Professional Services, including training of nature guides and other related services that are able to ensure safe distance.
  • Public and private game farms have been opened for self-drive excursions.
  • Hiking to be done in compliance with existing guidelines and not in groups.
  • Accommodation activities are allowed, except for leisure.
  • Establishments will no longer require a letter from the Minister of Tourism to operate. They are required to ensure that they accommodate those in the permitted services and keep records for inspections by the department.
  • Hunting and gaming activities are also allowed.

Kubayi-Ngubane said that following economic activities remain prohibited:

  • Conferences, events, and entertainment activities (except venues that are being used in the fight against the pandemic, eg. distribution points of social relief measures).
  • Casinos and Leisure travel.

South Africa’s department of Basic Education has delayed the reopening of the country’s schools by a week to better prepare for the return of students.

According to the department, schools will open for all grades 7 and 12 pupils on Monday, 8 June 2020, the Department of Basic Education said in a statement on Sunday evening.

The announcement comes after the education department published the updated academic calendar for schools in South Africa on Friday (29 May).

In the directive, the department said that the return of students in other grades will be staggered, with some students returning from 6 July, while the last of the country’s learners are expected to return from 3 August.

One of the most controversial new changes is the partial reopening of places of worship.

Under level 4, all religious gatherings, except for funerals, were banned to limit the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic.

There were then calls for South Africa’s President (Cyril Ramaphosa) to allow churches and other religious institutions to open under alert level 3 of the lockdown.

The president said there was subsequently a meeting of the National Coronavirus Command Council which considered the inputs in recent consultations with interfaith leaders. Following this meeting, Ramaphosa announced that current restrictions on religious gatherings will be eased.

He said places of worship – including churches, synagogues, temples, and mosques – will be allowed to open under alert level 3.

Regulations published by the country’s Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs further outline the restrictions – including a hard limit of 50 people inside places of worship.

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