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Weijia Jang: 27 Things You Didn’t Know About Weijia Jang and Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Things You Didn’t Know About Weijia Jang and Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Things You Didn’t Know About Weijia Jang and Her Confrontations with Donald Trump
Things You Didn’t Know About Weijia Jang and Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Do you wanna that reporter that has confronted President Donald Trump on interviews countless times? Then you’re probably on the right site because we’ll be telling you things you need to know about Weijia Jang. Well, for those of you that might have already known about her, I’ll bet you that there are still some other key facts which you still don’t know about Weijia Jang. So, therefore, read through this article below in order to get the full gist on things to know about Weijia Jang, and her confrontations with Donald Trump. Since July 2018, she has served as White House Correspondent for CBS News, and it’s her tense interactions with President Donald Trump at press briefings that have received global attention and coverage.

Weijia Jang is a Chinese-American television journalist and reporter. She was born in Xiamen, China to Liya Wei and Huade John Jiang. She and her familyimmigrated to America when she was two years old, and was raised in Buckannon, West Virginia, where her parents, who are now retired, owned and operated Chinatown Restaurant. Weijia Jiang met Travis Luther lower in college, where they co-hosted a weekly campus television show. Jiang later married Travis Luther Lowe, who is now an executive at Yelp and a donor to Democratic Party candidates and causes, in Palm Springs, California. On December 2018, she gave birth to her daughter Frankie Mei.

Jiang graduated from the College of William & Mary with a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and a minor in Chemistry. She worked on the student-run television station WMTV, and credits the university for developing her curiosity. She earned a Master’s in broadcast journalism from Syracuse University. She was later inducted into Newhouse School’s Professional Gallery. Jiang became interested in journalism after encouragement from an eighth-grade teacher. Together, they prepared a home-made TV show to submit to a competition run by the national student broadcast Channel One, leading to an opportunity for Jiang to intern as a student anchor and reporter in Los Angeles for two weeks. During high school, Jiang worked on the high school video news staff. Now read further below in order to still know about Weijia Jang.

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Weijia Jang and Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Everything You need to Know About Weijia Jiang

We’ll now be detailing you on all you need to know about Weijia Jang prior to her background and early life, her career, and as well as her interviews with President Donald Trump.

Backgroung and Early Life of Weijia Wang

  • Weijia Jiang was born 6 June 1983 in Xiamen, China to parents Liya Wei and Huade “John” Jiang, and immigrated with her family to America at the age of two.
  • She was raised in Buckhannon, West Virginia where her parents, who are now retired, owned and operated Chinatown Restaurant.
  • In 2005 Jiang graduated from the College of William & Mary with a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and a minor in Chemistry.
  • She earned a Master’s in broadcast journalism from Syracuse University, graduating in 2006.
  • She was inducted into Newhouse School’s Professional Gallery in 2012.
  • Jiang met Travis Luther Lowe in college, where they co-hosted a weekly campus television show.
  • On March 17, 2018, Jiang married Travis Lowe who is currently an executive at Yelp and a donor to Democratic Party candidates and causes, in Palm Springs, California. Jim Obergefell led the ceremony which also featured a Chinese tea ceremony. Jiang and Lowe had met
  • On December 2018, she gave birth to her daughter Frankie Mei.
Things You Didn’t Know About Weijia Jang

What we Need to Know About Weijia Jiang Career & Achievements

  • Weijia Jiang is a Chinese-born American, and currently a television journalist and reporter, and has served as White House Correspondent for CBS News since 2018.
  • Jiang began broadcasting at the age of 13 as a student reporter and anchor for Channel One News in Los Angeles, having won a student competition.
  • After completing her broadcast journalist degree, she became a reporter for WBOC-TV between 2006-2008 before spending four years as a general assignment reporter at WJZ-TV in Baltimore.
  • For her feature reporting at WBOC-TV, she was honoured with an Edward R. Murrow Award and an Associated Press Award.
  • During her 3 year stint at CBS New York as a general assignment reporter and fill-in anchor for WCBS-TV, Jiang covered major stories such as Superstorm Sandy, the Boston Marathon bombings, and the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary.
  • In 2013 WJZ-TV, she won a regional Emmy award in the 34th News & Documentary Emmy Awards for their coverage Newtown Tragedy, which Jiang was involved in.
  • Jiang moved to Washington D.C. to become a correspondent for Newspath, the 24-hour newsgathering service for CBS News.
  • In 2014 Jiang was the Gala Dinner MC for the Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business Gala Dinner which also featured letters of support from then-president Barack Obama, Andrew Cuomo and Bill de Blasio.
  • In 2018 Jiang became CBS News White House Correspondent, covering political stories including the President’s summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Mueller Probe.
  • As part of her role, Jiang has travelled with the President, including on-board Air Force One.
  • Jiang is a member of the Asian American Journalists Association.
  • Jiang has been reporting during the Covid-19 pandemic and attends the White House briefings.

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Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Her Confrontations with Donald Trump

Since Weijia Jiang became a White House Correspondent in 2018, she has found herself in numerous clashes with President Trump, often in response to her line of questioning. These interactions have amassed global news coverage questioning sensitive issues around racism. Now let’s take a look at her clashes with the president below:

  • On June 15, 2018, Jiang asked President Trump why he felt North Korea no longer posed a nuclear threat to which he raised his hand and said “Quiet” before remarking to another person, “She’s so obnoxious”.
  • On September 26, 2018, Jiang was told to “sit down” after repeatedly asking President Trump about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
  • On March 17, 2020, Jiang reported that a “White House official referred to Coronavirus as the ‘Kung-Flu’ to my face.”
  • On April 3, 2020, in response to Jiang’s question about Jared Kushner‘s use of “our” to describe the national stockpile, President Trump called it a “nasty question.”
  • On April 19, 2020, when questioned on why President Trump did not warn Americans about the virus sooner, Jiang was told to “just relax” and to “keep your voice down”.
  • On May 11, 2020, Jiang’s questioned why there was an emphasis on competitively comparing coronavirus testing, President Trump responded “Don’t ask me. Ask China that question.” Jiang responded “Sir, why are you saying that to me, specifically?” to which Trump replied “I am not saying it specifically to anybody. I am saying it to anybody who would ask a nasty question like that.” Trump abruptly stormed off the press conference when a second reporter challenged him on the order of operations.

Despite Trump’s frequent, repeated boasts that the U.S. is “the best in the world on testing,” it’s simply not true — the country trails behind many others in terms of per capita testing, and Trump’s own administration has projected that the daily death toll is likely to keep rising through June. Meanwhile, there’s currently an outbreak of coronavirus at the White House, threatening to undermine Trump’s blustering reassurances that it’s safe to start opening up the nation. So you can see how his logic is being proved wrong countless times.

This time, the president attempted to silence an Asian American reporter with a very valid question. Whether the United States has more tests than other countries does not address whether the tests are accurate or readily available, or whether those tests are doing anything useful in terms of helping us exit quarantine and continue to navigate this new normal. So, let’s talk about Jiang’s question, which interrogated Trump’s measure of testing success, a necessary prerequisite to reopening the economy. This is a point that is especially important now as protests erupt across rural America.

Again, Trump’s avoidance diminishes any critical response to his statements, which is a necessary function of journalism. Throughout the pandemic, he has failed to address how the United States’ delayed testing led to widespread and prolonged stay-at-home orders or why there was a lack of resources in hospitals. Investigative reporters assessed the systemic problems in our government, hospitals, and other institutions. White House correspondents scrutinized false statements, rigorously questioning an administration that shares inaccuracies with the world. For more than three years, reporters have slogged through muddled “truth,” investigating, re-examining, and in many cases debunking it.

Prior to the same Covid-19 issue, leaders of the Trump administration’s coronavirus response told a Senate panel that the US did not have the capacity to control a spike in cases if the nation prematurely opened the economy. Dr Anthony Fauci warned that states coming out of lockdown could see a very grim reality within weeks. We know people — especially young people — can be asymptomatic carriers of Covid-19, which is why antigen tests are as important as antibody tests to help control and mitigate such a spike. Unfortunately, it’s still unclear whether those tests are available and accessible in the numbers they will need to be.

As the months passed, overcrowded hospitals and makeshift intensive care units became the norm in New York City hospitals while Covid-19 cases steadily rose. It is the hope that another spike in cases is prevented, though one could soon be coming for states that abandon social distancing — and a spike in those states will inevitably lead to another in a well-connected, densely populated city like New York.

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