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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Breonna Taylor

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Breonna Taylor

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Breonna Taylor
10 Things You Didn’t Know About Breonna Taylor

If you’ve been following up on the latest report concerning the death of Breonna Taylor, then this article will help you in order to get to know about Breonna Taylor. Breonna Taylor, 26, is an African-American, who was an ER technician who had worked at two area hospitals, Palmer told The Courier-Journal. Taylor had previously worked as a certified EMT and aspired to further her career in health care. So, therefore, just read further below in order to know about Breonna Taylor.

On the 13th of March, 2020, Breonna Taylor, was fatally shot by the Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) officers. Ever since then, this incident has caused mixed feelings between members of the public and the U.S government at large. Although, Lawyers for Ms. Taylor’s family have suggested that the intense focus on the Covid-19 pandemic over the past few months most likely affected the initial response  from people in the community and in the news media. Now let’s kick-start on the things you need to know about Breonna Taylor and all about her death.

Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly, Detective Brett Hankison, and Detective Myles Cosgrove entered Breonna’s apartment in plainclothes in Louisville,Kentucky,  while serving a “no-knock warrant.” Prior to that incident, Gunfire was exchanged between Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, and the three LMPD officers who entered the apartment. Taylor was shot eight times, and Mattingly was injured by gunfire. As it stands, there has been an investigation on two individuals who were already in police custody and suspected of selling controlled substances from a drug house more than 10 miles (16 km) away.

For weeks after Taylor’s death, there was very little public reaction or response from government officials. The LMPD has not provided many details about the shooting or answers to questions about the case. Taylor’s death gained national attention when activist Shaun King posted about her shooting death on social media. 

One of the individuals in custody, Jamarcus Glover, had a prior relationship with Taylor.The search warrant included Breonna Taylor’s residence, which had been suspected of receiving drugs in the case, and because a car registered to Taylor had been seen parked on several occasions in front of Glover’s house. According to police, Walker fired first, injuring a law enforcement officer, and police returned fire. According to a wrongful death lawsuit filed against the police by Taylor’s family, the officers entered the home without knocking or announcing that they were police officers, and “then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life.”

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Breonna Taylor BIO

All You Need to Know About Breonna Taylor

Before we take you through the death incident of Breonna Taylor, we’ll first of all highlight you about her background.

About the Life and Background of Breonna Taylor

  • Breonna Taylor was born on the 5th of June, 1993 in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
  • Her parents were Tamika Palmer and Troy Herrod.
  • She graduated from Western High School.
  • She also went on to study at the University of Kentucky.
  • She was an emergency medical tecnician.
  •  Breonna worked at two hospitals, University of Louisville Jewish Hospital and Norton Healthcare.
  • She was working for University of Louisville Health before her death.
  • She was dating  Kenneth Walker 27, and was also living with him in the same apartment before her death.
  • On the 13th of March, 2020, Breonna Taylor, was fatally shot by the Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) officers in the same apartment she was staying with her boyfriend.
  • She was then buried in Spring Valley, Illinois.

Now that you’ve been able to know about Breonna Taylor with respect to her background and her death, let’s then take you through what has been going on after her death, with respect to the investigations and legal proceedings.

 Breonna Taylor death

Status of the Investigations of the Death of Breonna Taylor

According to the report coming from Walker’s defendant as testified by Walker himself, “None of the officers were wearing body cameras, as all three were plainclothes narcotics officers”.Taylor and Walker thought their home had been broken into by criminals and that “they were in significant, imminent danger.” The lawsuit alleges that “the officers then entered Breonna’s home without knocking and without announcing themselves as police officers. The Defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life.

  • On May 15, 2020, a wrongful death lawsuit filed by Taylor’s family. The lawsuit stated that Taylor and Walker were sleeping in their bedroom before the incident happened, and that the police officers were in unmarked vehicles.
  • Breonna’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, initially faced criminal charges of first-degree assault and attempted murder of a police officer.
  • On May 13, 2020, Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear responded to reports about Taylor’s death and said the public deserved to know everything about the March raid. Beshear requested that the Kentucky Attorney General, Daniel Cameron, and local and federal prosecutor to review the findings of the Louisville police’s initial investigation “to ensure justice is done at a time when many are concerned that justice is not blind.”
  • On May 14, photos were released to the public in The Courier-Journal by Sam Aguiar, an attorney representing Breonna Taylor’s family. The photos show bullet damage in their apartment and the apartment next door.
  • Still on May 14, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad announced they have asked the United States FBI and the United States Attorney to review the local findings of the Public Integrity Unit’s investigation when it is completed.
  • An LMPD statement alleged that the officers announced themselves before entering the home, and that Walker first opened fire on them which eventually led to an injury to one of the enforcement officers.
  • Walker’s lawyer stated that Walker thought that someone was entering the residence illegally, and that Walker acted only on self-defense. Walker’s close friends said that his job was to protect Taylor at any cost.
  • The 911 calls were later released to the public, with Walker recorded telling the 911 operator, that “somebody kicked in the door and shot my girlfriend”.
  • On May 20, officers were responding to a 911 call near Taylor’s apartment and multiple people threw pieces of concrete at them and then ran away. No law enforcement officers were injured.
  • On May 21, after intense local and national criticism for the department’s handling of the case, Police Chief Steve Conrad announced his retirement to be effective on June 30.The LMPD has also announced that it will require all sworn officers to wear body cameras and will change how it carries out search warrants.
  • On May 22, Judge Olu Stevens released Walker from home incarceration. Rob Eggert, an attorney representing Walker, released a statement saying, “he just wanted to resume his life”. At the same time, his attorney said that he could be charged again later as more facts come out of the shooting.
  • On May 26, multiple protesters, including friends and family of Taylor, surrounded the office of Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, demanding the three officers be arrested and charged with murder. Another protest is planned for May 30.
  • On May 27, 2020, the LMPD said it had received multiple death threats like “All cops need to die” and “kill pigs”.
  • On May 28, Louisville office of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced it had opened an investigation.
  • Still on that May 28, around 500 to 600 demonstrators marched in Downtown Louiseville,  where people chanted “No justice, no peace, prosecute police!” and “Breonna, Breonna, Breonna!”
  • The protests continued into the early morning of May 29, when seven people were shot; one of the victims was in critical condition. At the same time, Taylor’s sister, Juniyah Palmer, posted a response to the protests on her Facebook page saying “At this point y’all are no longer doing this for my sister! You guys are just vandalizing stuff for NO reason, I had a friend ask people why they are there most didn’t even know the “protest” was for my sister
  • Robert Brown, special agent in charge for the office, said “The FBI will collect all available facts and evidence and will ensure that the investigation is conducted in a fair, thorough and impartial manner.”
  • Walker was later released from jail due to coronavirus concerns, which drew criticism from Louisville Metro Police Department Chief Steve Conrad.
  • In late May, Commonwealth’s Attorney Tom Wine moved to dismiss all charges against Walker. The case could be presented to a grand jury again after reviewing the results of investigations by the FBI and Kentucky Attorney General’s Office.
  • Wine dropped the charges because the officers never mentioned Breonna Taylor by name to the grand jury or the fact that they shot her.

Having been able to know about Breonna Taylor, as well as her death,  and all that has been going on as regards to the case of her death, we’ll now have to look into the Louisville Metro Police Department (LMPD) with respect to the incident that occurred.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Breonna Taylor

Accessing the Policy of the Louiseville Police With Respect to the Incident

  • As it stands in the current state, new policy changes will require greater use of body cameras by Louisville police and more scrutiny of no-knock warrants. Just like it was announced by Fischer on May 18th , saying that “All no-knock warrants will now require the police chief or his designee to sign off on them before going to a judge for final approval.” This, he said, will provide “An additional level of scrutiny.”
  • Additionally, Fischer said the department’s body camera policy will now require all sworn officers to wear cameras when serving warrants or in any situation in which they will identify themselves as police officers.The changes comes in response to two major concerns in Taylor’s death: that police were acting on a no-knock warrant, and that those officers were not wearing body cameras.
  • But by the end of the week, two members of Louisville Metro Council filed legislation that would restrict and monitor the circumstances in which police can use no-knocks even further. The legislation, filed by Jessica Green and Barbara Sexton Smith, calls for banning no-knocks completely if drug possession is the only suspected criminal activity.
  • Fischer also announced Monday that the city would create a work group of community, public safety and criminal justice leaders to explore creating stronger civilian review of the police department. 

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